First Congregational Church
(United Church of Christ)
Neil H. Wilson, Pastor

101 State Street
Charlevoix, MI 49720
231-547-9122


Gospel Transparency

~ Sermon ~ June 25th, 2017 ~ Pastor Neil Wilson

Gospel Transparency
Matthew 10:1, 5-7, 24-33

I have a task for each of you today. The instructions are simple.

Following this morning’s service and the coffee hour I am sending you out to your neighborhoods. I want you to start with those who are struggling, confused the lost if you will, amongst those of our community, your neighbors and friends.
Those of you in the balcony, I will have you to concentrate on downtown, shopkeepers, their employees, and any of the local people you know. The tourists, well, they’ll have to wait.
Those of you who sit on the north side of the sanctuary, I want you to focus on this message: “The kingdom of heaven is here, very near to everyone”
South side of the sanctuary, you are to be the healers, the counselors, the resuscitators. Offer freely. Expect no payment.
You will not need your cell phones, or your tablets, no fancy suits or special uniforms, nor will you need to have a fund raising campaign before you begin. You will be taken care of. Just go!
If you should find there are those who refuse what you are freely offering, do not make a scene and argue with them, just move on. Their stubbornness will catch up with them in good time. And that will be very difficult time indeed! And after all it is not your mission you are but the messengers.
What do you think? Would you be willing to take on such a calling? How many of you would be ready to hit the streets after coffee hour? How many of you would not want to leave the coffee hour and safety of the church building?
Yet this is what Jesus called the Twelve to do: Share the good news of the Kingdom of Heaven with the lost sheep of Israel, their neighbors; to heal, cast out demons, raise the dead!
How comfortable did you feel about the instructions I gave you?
I can answer for myself, “Not very!”
I would imagine for the twelve is was also a difficult, risky “assignment.” It is quite possible they might have asked, “Jesus, do you think we are ready for this? We’ve only been with you for a few weeks (months) and to be honest we’ve seen the mixed reactions people have had towards you!”
And so Jesus says to them “ . . . have no fear of them.”
The same providence of God that he shared in the Sermon on the Mount, he reminds them of here. “Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father. And even the hairs on your head are all counted So do not be afraid you are of more value than many sparrows.”
Jesus then says something interesting, “Nothing is covered up that will not be uncovered . . .”
There is complete openness to the work of Jesus. Jesus has no intention of starting a cult, an exclusive spiritual club with a secret wisdom and rituals in which an hierarchy of a select few will be in control and ultimately reap any spiritual benefits.
Now, we hear this today and are apt to smugly think, “Well, our church is nothing like that.” Experience, though, teaches that some churches are very much like that: an exclusive religious club with secret wisdom and rituals which only an elite group understand and thus are granted “salvation.”
In many cases church leaders hold onto their power (whether officially through board positions or not) by refusing to be “up front” about things, from agendas to relationships to intrachurch dynamics. Only those deemed worthy are allowed full participation, and usually only by conforming to unspoken (thus hidden) rules and expectations. Talk with Conference staff about the church conflicts they are often called in to mediate and one will hear the same refrain, “Communication, communication, communication.”
Full participation should never be determined by the supposed charity of so-called “gatekeepers”, but by the absolute grace of Jesus’ unconditional love. Further-more, it is not only “secret wisdom” that interferes with full participation, it is often just the plain old “secrets” kept from newcomers that are at the root of dysfunctional behavior within a church.
Jesus then warns any would be disciples: “Do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.”
“Hell” is Gehenna, the valley outside the walls of Jerusalem, where it is said the city’s trash was continually burned; thus it is more a metaphor than a doctrine of a place in eternity. One way to think of this metaphorically is to recognize that the only one we have to fear is ourselves, because only we can destroy both soul and body in the fires of our own making. If this is so then when we prayer the Lord’s prayer “deliver us from evil,” we pray to be delivered from our own evil, which we experience as more toxic to our spiritual well-being than anything anyone else could do to us.
Jesus then says, “Everyone therefore who acknowledges me before others, I will also acknowledge before my Father in heaven; but whoever denies me before others, I also will deny before my Father in heaven.” As harsh as this may sound to us, this seems to be the “bottom line” of Jesus’ instructions to his disciples in Matthew 10. Those of us reading it today contemporary and privileged readers, may think that the first disciples and early Christians needed to hear this more than we do, as do those Christians living as religious minorities and often the brunt of sectarian oppression and violence.
The truth is that persecution exists today even in our nation’s privileged world of religious freedom. It’s just more subtle, more often expressed in apathy than antipathy. For the vast majority religion has become a private matter, often banned, along with politics from “polite discussion.” We are of the mind whether through a misunderstanding of the “separation of church and state” or just a simple aversion to politics that our religious values have no place in the public political discourse.
Because of this, unfortunately, the church’s shaping of public policy is to frequently left to those Christians with a politically confining agenda.
No Christian should check Jesus’ values at the door when exiting the church and entering the public sphere: Jesus’ compassion for the poor, the sick, the imprisoned, the vulnerable and the demonized may (and should) shape public policy just as much as the Enlightenment values of equality, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is in this way as well, we “proclaim the good news that the ‘Kingdom of heaven has come near.’”
In the history of our nation the revivals of the two Great Spiritual Awakenings led the way to the significant social reforms that followed.
There is one more way I feel this may speak to our contemporary views of “sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ.” Some Christians place conditions on God’s unconditional and extravagant love in Jesus Christ, resisting the gospel of grace. And on the other hand there are those Christians , in deference to our multicultural and multi-faith world, avoid talking about Jesus at all and resist a gospel of particularity. We worry about being offensive. Some would say politically correct.
In reality, each is a way of denying both Jesus and his gospel message that the realm of God is at hand.
For the gospel is not something to be hidden away. But to be shared and to be observed in the lives of Jesus’ disciples. Our lives should be transparent enough so that to anyone who cares to observe, the gospel, the way of Jesus, should be obvious.
Years ago when I started on my path toward ordained ministry I kept a little notebook of quotes. I haven’t been as faithful in collecting quotes as I was back at the beginning. One of the very first quotes I wrote in my book I heard from Roger Cobb, an elderly man from my home church when I was a young adult.
He would say to me sort of as a reminder:
“You are writing a Gospel,
A chapter each day,
By deeds that you do,
By words that you say.

Others read what you write,
Whether faithless or true;
Say, what is the Gospel
According to you?”

Listen to the audio version of Pastor Neil’s Sermon.  Select the “Download File”, and at the lower left of your screen you can select it and enjoy.

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